Sunday, August 18, 2019

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Share your stories and ideas with the network as you respond to crisis and disaster.
Tag » Disaster Preparedness

Hope is the state, which promotes the belief in a good outcome related to events and circumstances in one's life. Hope is the "feeling that what is wanted can be had or that events will turn out for the best" or the act of "looking forward to something with desire and reasonable confidence" or "feeling that something desired may happen".

Other definitions are "to cherish a desire with anticipation"; "to desire with expectation of obtainment"; or "to expect with confidence".  In the English language the word can be used as either a noun or a verb, although hope as a concept has a similar meaning in either use.

“O Lord, You alone are my hope.” Psalm 71:5 

Lord, as believers in Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ we come to you today to Pray4America on our knees with all humility acknowledging that we in ourselves have no strength, wisdom or empowerment to carry your banner of righteousness without the indwelling of your Holy Spirit.  (Acts 2:4)

 

Complacency  

I used to not understand how people could not heed the warnings when inclement weather was headed their way…now that I’ve lived in DC for a year, it actually makes a lot more sense.

Since moving to DC, I have lived “through” a Derecho, Hurricane Sandy and the “Snowquester.” The Derecho didn’t even knock out my power, Hurricane Sandy was nothing more than a thunderstorm similar to an Arizona monsoon storm and the “Snowquester” snowed just enough to turn to slush then melt within 24 hours.

Power Outages

6 Ways to Keep Refrigerated and Frozen Food Safe After a Power Outage

An electrical power outage will affect the safe storage of refrigerated and frozen foods. Perishable food such as meat, poultry, seafood, milk and eggs that are not stored properly refrigerated or frozen may cause illness if consumed. In order to protect these foods from spoilage and save them for your use during the emergency, follow the guidelines listed below:

  1. Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible to maintain the cold temperature. The refrigerator will keep foods cold for 2-4 hours if it is unopened. Full freezers will hold the temperature for approximately 48 hours if the door remains closed. These times may vary depending on age of the unit, condition of the seals, temperature setting and amount of food.
  2. Digital, dial, or instant-read food thermometer and appliance thermometers will help you know if the food is at a safe temperature.
  3. Before eating perishable refrigerated foods (milk, cheeses, eggs, meats, fish, or poultry) be sure tocheck their temperature. Foods that are 40º F or below can be eaten and are considered safe. Foods that are above 40º F for more than 2 hours must be discarded. Do Not Eat. Don't trust your sense of smell. Food may be unsafe even if it doesn't smell bad.
  4. Thawed food can usually be eaten if it is still 40ºF or re-frozen if it still contains ice crystals or is below 40ºF. You have to evaluate each food item separately. Partial thawing and refreezing may reduce the quality of some food, but the food will remain safe to eat.
  5. If the power is out for longer than 4 hours, use dry ice. 25 pounds of dry ice will keep a ten cubic foot freezer below freezing for 3-4 days. Handle dry ice with care and wear dry heavy gloves to avoid injury.
  6. Follow the golden rule of food safety, "When in Doubt, Throw it Out", for any foods which you are not sure have stayed at a safe temperature or which do not look or smell as they should.

Power Outage

As I'm sitting here the wind is blowing and the wet, heavy snow is swirling around outside, making the potential for power outages a likelihood. Thunderstorms and other inclement weather can also affect power outages.

Here are some tips for how to prepare when power outages are a concern:

In  the President’s plan to reduce gun violence the statistics related to school risk and emergency planning mirror the same needs as those of houses of worship.

“A 2010 survey found that while 84 percent of public schools had a written response plan in the event of a shooting, only 52 percent had drilled their students on the plan in the past year. We must ensure that every school has a high-quality plan in place and that students and staff are prepared to follow it.”

In May of this year DHS will work intentionally to address this sobering statistic for schools and houses of worship.  The Department of Education, Justice, Health and Human Services will be releasing model, high-quality emergency management plans for schools, houses of worship, and institutions of higher education, along with best practices for developing these plans and training students and staff to follow them. In addition, the Department of Homeland Security, in coordination with the Department of Justice, will assist interested schools, houses of worship, and institutions of higher education in completing their own security assessments.